Monthly Archives: November 2013

Sourdough bread

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Here’s the king of 2013; my very own first sourdough bread; seven days and seven nights I have been watching it, feeding it and keeping it warm, safe and sound. On the seventh day, 16 day of November… It became the bread. The one I remember from my childhood; sour, dense and moisty. Not very spectacular by appearance but that was supposed to be a test only and no much hopes I had with it … but..Delicious. I will update with the exact recipe soon.

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Now, here's how to become the hero;

Day1, evening

Take 2 tablespoons rye flour and 1 tablespoon lukewarm water, and mix together in a big jar. Cover with a piece of cotton and set aside to some warm place. The best is close to a medium hot heater. If the heater is very hot, eg you cannot keep your hand on it – then its bettwr not to place the jar directly on the heater, but lets say, 15 cm away.

Day 2, morning

Add 2 tablespoons rye flour, 1 tablespoon lukewarm water. Mix with wooden spoon. Set back aside.

Day 2 evening

Repeat morning 馃檪 until day 5.

Day 5
By now you should have a full jar of bubbling starter. It smells vinegar/apples and has acid taste. Dont worry if the bubbles are small. Dont worry if the taste is delicate or if it is watery (add more flour). The exact meassurment is not so important. Worry only if there are green or black spots- it means it got rotten.

If absolutely nothing happens for 5 days: no bubbles no growing; then discard 3/4 of the mixture ( never discard it all!) and add 2 portions of flour against 1 portion of water, mix and repeat for the next 2 days; this was my case and on the 6th day I've got this beautiful, lively starter

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Good news is, once you raise your starter for 5-7 days, you can keep it in the fridge (always leave 2 spoons of the starter) for 2 weeks.